DAR partners with SCKCC on mini-library project

At left is June Jackson, chapter regent of the Edmund Rogers Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, with Sherry Wesley, executive director of the South Central Kentucky Cultural Center. They are standing beside the free mini-library that is positioned near the entrance to the cultural center along W. Water Street. The cultural center and the DAR partnered together on the project in an effort to promote literacy. Gina Kinslow / Glasgow Daily Times 

GLASGOW — Positioned near the entrance to the South Central Kentucky Cultural Center is a box filled with a variety of books. 

The box sits atop a pedestal and is actually a free mini-library.

It was placed by the entrance to the cultural center along West Water Street by members of the Edmund Rogers Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution in an effort to promote literacy.

Deana Snow, assistant chair of the DAR's literacy committee, read an article in a magazine about another DAR chapter that had done a similar project.

“I spoke to Kay (Harbison), the literacy person, and we decided it would be a great idea,” Snow said. “And so I went on the website for the little free library and downloaded the plans. And then we discussed who we could get to make it.”

Snow spoke to Jerry Lyons, a Barren County woodworker, who agreed to donate his labor to make the box if the DAR supplied the materials.

“He does a beautiful job,” Snow said.

She contacted members of the DAR about monetary contributions for the supplies and then at Lyons' suggestion she spoke to officials with the Lyons Company Mechanical Contractors and Engineers in Glasgow about making a stand for the box. The company provided the supplies and the labor free.

Ron Summerfield of Summer Shade, who volunteers at the cultural center, put the mini-library together, donating his time to do it because he said it was for a good cause, Snow said.

“It has taken us a while,” she said. “This has been going on for eight or nine months.”

Members of the DAR went to library book sales to get books for the mini-library, while some DAR members brought books from their own private collections, she said.

“The concept is you take a book and keep it. You can put books in if you want to exchange books,” said June Jackson, chapter regent.

But on Tuesday the mini-library was assembled and is now ready for use.

“The cultural center is happy to partner with the DAR in this community project that encourages sharing books and building literacy,” said Sherry Wesley, executive director of the cultural center. 

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