Monday

Sign Language: 9:30 a.m.

Learn basic American Sign Language with instructor Logan Brooks. Appropriate for children and adults. Children under the age of 11 should be accompanied by an adult. Sign up at the library.

Sing-A-Book My Baby: 9:30 a.m.

Be a participant in the Summer Reading Celebration this year. They are doing things a little differently this year by having lots of cool prize give-a-ways! July 29 will be water days: wear your swimsuit; bring sunscreen and a towel.

LEGO Robotics: 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Do you enjoy designing and building? Are you interested in coding? Come create a robot using LEGO’s MindStorm or WeDo sets. The Lego robotics group meets the second Monday of each month. Grades 1–9.

Tuesday

Book Sprouts Story Time: 10 a.m.

Be a participant in the Summer Reading Celebration this year. They are doing things a little differently this year by having lots of cool prize give-a-ways! July 30 will be water days: wear your swimsuit; bring sunscreen and a towel!

Sci-Fi Writing Contest Reading and Awards: 6 p.m.

Writers from the Summer Sci-Fi Writing Contest will read selections from their entries and awards will be presented. Family, friends and community members are invited.

Wednesday

Tator Tot Time: 10 a.m.

Be a participant in the Summer Reading Celebration this year. They are doing things a little differently this year by having lots of cool prize give-a-ways! July 31 will be water days: wear your swimsuit; bring sunscreen and a towel!

Thursday

Color Me Calm: 10 a.m.

Coloring isn’t just for kids anymore. It can reduce anxiety and create focus. Go color. The library provides coloring pages, supplies and refreshments.

Fairy Gardens: 1 p.m.

Children love fairy gardens. They are magical and great for imaginative play. Surprisingly to some, they are actually easy to make and don’t have to cost a fortune. The Glasgow Garden Club will provide all supplies and lend a hand to children as they create their very own fairy garden. Fee is $3. Registration required. Ages 5-12.

Friday

Blast Off! Rocket Making: 11 a.m.

In this activity, you will get to blast an object into the air using two simple ingredients to make a rocket. They will use plastic film canisters, baking soda and vinegar to launch the rockets into the air. For grades K-8.

 

Book Review

“Madame Fourcade’s Secret War,” by Lynne Olson

Publication Date: March 5, 2019

Review by Amy Tollison, Mary Wood Weldon Memorial Library

Marie-Madeleine Fourcade joined the French resistance long before the Germans set foot on French soil. Recruited by Major Georges Loustaunau-Lacau, a.k.a. Navarre, Marie-Madeleine worked as his deputy to call attention to the threat that the Germans posed to France. The French leadership failed to heed the warning, and in May, 1940 the Nazis smashed through France’s defenses and began to occupy the country. Navarre quickly moved to form a network of spies and put Fourcade in charge of recruiting and organizing. They formed a resistance group that would become known as Alliance, the largest organization of its kind during the occupation and the only one to be led by a woman. Early in the war, Navarre was captured, and at his behest, Fourcade became the leader of Alliance. In a place and time where women were undervalued, this beautiful, young socialite controlled an organization of hundreds of agents. Many were civilians who were furious at their own government’s capitulation and collaboration. Their inexperience sometimes led to disastrous security consequences, but they were also responsible for some of the greatest intelligence coups of the war, like the 55-foot long detailed map of the defenses of the beaches of Normandy. Fourcade continued to lead Alliance throughout the war. She was arrested twice and escaped both times. After the war, she poured herself into discovering the fates of lost operatives and fighting for benefits for survivors and families.

“Madame Fourcade’s Secret War” is a biography that reads like a thriller. It is full of heroic action, self-sacrifice, duty and danger. The agents pulled off thrilling escapes, but many also paid the ultimate price, dying in Nazi prisons and camps. Until recently, history downplayed or even completely ignored the role of women in World War II. Lynne Olson brings back into the spotlight not only Marie-Madeleine Fourcade, but also many female agents, couriers and friends whose courage and intelligence were a vital part of the effort. The author presents a clear and thorough portrait of an amazing and complicated woman whom history had nearly forgotten. She also paints a picture of the convoluted political situation among French leaders and resistance groups that often caused them to work against each other as much as against the Nazis.

This is a fascinating account of a little known part of history and of an enigmatic woman. It’s a great read for anyone who loves history, spies and strong female characters. Check it out at the library.