Glasgow Daily Times, Glasgow, KY

Local News

November 29, 2013

Woman’s family hit by typhoon Haiyan

GLASGOW — Adelina Skrovan talks to her family in the Philippines each night, getting updates on how they are doing in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.

The typhoon made landfall on Nov. 8, striking six Philippine islands, including those where many members of her family live.

Her family has cell phone service, but little else.

“There’s no food. They’ve run out of food and water,” said the Barren County resident.

Her family must travel six hours to Ormoc City, which is the nearest city to them, just to buy food.

Adelina did not know if her family had survived the typhoon until four days after it came ashore.

“They went through Ormoc City because they have the signal over there for their cell and they called me to tell me they were OK, but all of their houses were flattened,” she said.

Her family members who lived in Tacloban City, which was destroyed by the typhoon, are presumed dead.

“I had a few relatives there on my mother’s side and my father’s side,” she said. “They are all gone. They were washed away. Some of them they haven’t found yet. They are still buried in the debris.”

Relief efforts have been under way since shortly after BY GINA KINSLOW

Glasgow Daily Times

Adelina Skrovan talks to her family in the Philippines each night, getting updates on how they are doing in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.

The typhoon made landfall on Nov. 8, striking six Philippine islands, including those where many members of her family live.

Her family has cell phone service, but little else.

“There’s no food. They’ve run out of food and water,” said the Barren County resident.

Her family must travel six hours to Ormoc City, which is the nearest city to them, just to buy food.

Adelina did not know if her family had survived the typhoon until four days after it came ashore.

“They went through Ormoc City because they have the signal over there for their cell and they called me to tell me they were OK, but all of their houses were flattened,” she said.

Her family members who lived in Tacloban City, which was destroyed by the typhoon, are presumed dead.

“I had a few relatives there on my mother’s side and my father’s side,” she said. “They are all gone. They were washed away. Some of them they haven’t found yet. They are still buried in the debris.”

Relief efforts have been under way since shortly after Hayian struck in the larger cities, but they have been slow to come to the villages where her family members live.

Her family has gone to Manila to stay until they can generate enough money to rebuild their homes in the barrio islands.

“They are planning to stay in Manila for a couple of months,” she said.

Survival following the typhoon has been difficult, due to price gouging and looting. Male members of the villages where her family members live stand guard in an effort to protect their homes.

“Their basic needs have doubled in price,” she said. “It’s really sad. They need some medicines, too.”

Watching video of the typhoon as it made landfall, as well as photos of the devastation following the storm makes Adelina emotional.

“Everything is washed out,” she said, as she watched a video on her laptop.

“It looks like a bomb went off,” said Ralph, her husband. The couple owns the Rock Cabin Campground on Ky. 70 near Cave City, moving to the area about three years ago from Ohio.

Adelina’s family was aware of the possibility that the typhoon would make landfall near where they lived. It wasn’t the first typhoon they had experienced.

“We’ve been through a lot, but this is the worst one,” she said.

Adelina was talking to one of her nieces at 1 a.m. the day the Haiyan made landfall.

“I called and told them they had to get out of the house,” she said.

At 4 a.m., she talked to another niece and a nephew.

“I told them to stay away from the house,” she said. “They told me the wind wasn’t blowing hard yet. It was still mild.”

The typhoon packed winds of more than 190 miles per hour and gusts of more than 200 miles per hour, she said.

One niece told her they were planning to seek refuge in a nearby school, but were going to wait until daybreak before they left their home.

“I said, ‘No, you have to get out. You shouldn’t sleep. Go. Leave now.’ I said take the kids there,” Adelina said. “I could hear the wind blowing.”

She called yet another niece who informed her that the wind was getting stronger. The distance between the villages where her nieces live is about the same as it is from Cave City to Horse Cave, she said.

Adelina is convinced her family members didn’t realize at first how strong the typhoon was really going to be, despite her warnings.

She and other members of her family who live in the United States are sending money to their relatives in the Philippines. The money is used to buy rice, which is the staple source of food.

“The price of rice is even double what it used to be,” Ralph said.

The Skrovans are in the process of setting up a bank account locally for those who would like to make a donation toward relief efforts for Adelina’s family.

Read more of this story in the print or digital Glasgow Daily Times. http://glasgowdailytimes.cnhi.newsmemory.com/

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