Glasgow Daily Times, Glasgow, KY

Community News Network

November 14, 2013

Stop-and-frisk led to few convictions, state study finds

NEW YORK — The New York Police Department's stop-and-frisk practices, ruled unconstitutional by a federal judge who was subsequently removed from the case, have led to convictions just 3 percent of the time, the state attorney general's office found.

New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman released a report Thursday showing that 75,000 guilty pleas or conviction at trial resulted from about 2.4 million stops from 2009 to 2012. The tactic has been assailed by civil rights groups, who say it unfairly targets racial minorities.

"It's our hope that this report - the first of its kind - will advance the discussion about how to fight crime without overburdening our institutions or violating equal justice under the law," Schneiderman said in a statement. The attorney general hasn't stated a position on the tactic.

The report used police and court data to examine offenses charged at the time of arrests, whether charges were reduced by the time of convictions, and racial disparities, according to Schneiderman's office.

Only 0.3 percent of all stops, or about 7,200, led to defendants' serving jail or prison sentences for more than 30 days, according to the report. Just 0.1 percent of stops, or about 2,400, led to convictions for violent crimes, it said.

A police spokesman said the report ignores crimes prevented by the practice.

"The report is clearly flawed, which is why it makes absolutely zero recommendations," John J. McCarthy, a spokesman for the department, said in an emailed statement. "This analysis somehow just ignores situations where an officer's action deters or prevents a crime from occurring in the first place. Those situations never result in an arrest, conviction or jail time because a crime is prevented."

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Manhattan ruled Wednesday that U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin can't challenge her removal from the suit over the stop-and-frisk tactic, which she found unconstitutional.

The court said Scheindlin ran "afoul of the Code of Conduct for United States judges" by making remarks to the press while the case was pending and suggesting that lawyers opposing the tactic use a court rule to steer a case to her. The appeals court said it made no findings of misconduct or bias on her part.

New York City appealed her ruling and won a stay from the appeals court delaying changes she ordered during the appeal.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg criticized Scheindlin's ruling and backed the city's appeal. Bloomberg is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent of Bloomberg News.

Bill de Blasio, the Democrat elected Nov. 5 to replace Bloomberg as mayor, opposed stop-and-frisk in his campaign and said he will withdraw the city's appeal.

In a separate report released Thursday, the New York Civil Liberties Union said it found a rise in discriminatory policing during the Bloomberg administration.

 A survey of 5,000 city residents showed people who had negative contacts with police, such as being stopped and frisked, were less likely than others to turn to the police when in need of help or when witnessing a crime.

 "People of color have borne an outsize burden of this injustice, but it impacts every New Yorker and the safety of the city as a whole when entire communities are afraid of the very police force that is supposed to protect them," Donna Lieberman, executive director of the organization, said in a statement.

 

1
Text Only
Community News Network
  • Affirmative action ruling challenges colleges seeking diversity

    The U.S. Supreme Court's support of Michigan's ban on race-based affirmative action in university admissions may spur colleges to find new ways to achieve diversity without using racial preferences.

    April 23, 2014

  • A 'wearable robot' helps her walk again

    Science is about facts, numbers, laws and formulas. To be really good at it, you need to spend a lot of time in school. But science is also about something more: dreaming big and helping people.

    April 23, 2014

  • Cuba is running out of condoms

    The newest item on Cuba's list of dwindling commodities is condoms, which are now reportedly in short supply. In response, the Cuban government has approved the sale of expired condoms.

    April 23, 2014

  • The waffle taco's biggest enemy isn't McDonald's. It's consumer habits.

    Gesturing to Taco Bell, Thompson said McDonald's had "not seen an impact relative to the most recent competitor that entered the [breakfast] space," and that new competition would only make McDonald's pursue breakfast more aggressively.

    April 23, 2014

  • Screen Shot 2014-04-22 at 4.42.47 PM.png VIDEO: Leopard attacks crowd in India

    A leopard caused panic in the city of Chandrapur when it sprung from the roof of a house and charged at rescue workers.

    April 22, 2014 1 Photo

  • The top 12 government programs ever

    Which federal programs and policies succeed in being cost-effective and targeting those who need them most? These two tests are obvious: After all, why would we spend taxpayers' money on a program that isn't worth what it costs or helps those who do not need help?

    April 22, 2014

  • In cuffs... 'Warlock' in West Virginia accused of sexual assault

    Police in West Virginia say a man claiming to be a “warlock” used promises of magical spells to lure children into committing sexual acts with him.

    April 22, 2014 1 Photo

  • Cats outsmart the researchers

    I knew a lot had been written about dogs, and I assumed there must be at least a handful of studies on cats. But after weeks of scouring the scientific world for someone - anyone - who studied how cats think, all I was left with was this statement, laughed over the phone to me by one of the world's top animal cognition experts, a Hungarian scientist named Ádám Miklósi.

    April 22, 2014

  • McCain 1 House Republicans are more active on Twitter than Democrats

    Your representative in the House is almost certainly on Twitter. Your senator definitely is. But how are they using the social network? Are Democrats more active than Republicans, or vice versa? Who has the most followers on the Hill?

    April 22, 2014 1 Photo

  • Do your genes make you procrastinate?

    Procrastinators, in my experience, like nothing better than explaining away their procrastination: General busyness, fear of failure, and simple laziness are just a handful of the excuses and theories often tossed around. Now researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder have added another option to the list: genetics.

    April 21, 2014

AP Video
Facebook
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Seasonal Content